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Holy Week Library Hours

Apr 11, 2022

Wright Library will close at 6pm (no entry after 5:30pm) on Thursday, April 14, 2022 (Maundy Thursday) and remain closed through Sunday, April 17, 2022 (Easter).

Interlibrary loan (ILL) service will be on pause Good Friday through Easter Sunday.

Regular hours and ILL service resume Monday, April 18.

New faculty books

Mar 17, 2022

New books by Princeton Seminary faculty in the library collection include:

  • The humility of the eternal son : reformed kenoticism and the repair of Chalcedon by Bruce L. McCormack
  • Indigeneity in African religions : Oza worldviews, cosmologies and religious cultures (e-book) by Afe Adogame
  • An invitation to Biblical poetry by Elaine T. James
  • Judges 1 : a commentary on Judges 1:1-10:5 by Mark S. Smith and Elizabeth Bloch-Smith
  • The love of learning : seven dialogues on the liberal arts by Margarita A. Mooney, editor and principal author, and
  • World Christianity, urbanization and identity edited by Moses O. Biney, Kenneth N. Ngwa and Raimundo C. Barreto

Lent 2022

Mar 2, 2022

The season of Lent in the Christian calendar begins March 2 (or 7) this year and runs through April 14 (or 15), depending your tradition.

In addition to a selection of books from the Wright Library collection, this year's curated bibliography also includes:

  • Lenten devotionals from Princeton Theological Seminary, 2015-2022 (print + online)
  • Ashes to Rainbows: A Queer Lenten Devotional, from Unbound and More Light Presbyterians: Features an array of voices and perspectives, thought-provoking theologies, and a new way to think about the time in which we call Lent.
  • Devocional de Cuaresma 2022 / Lenten Devotional 2022, from Unbound: Una Jornada Para Surcir - ¡Únase a nosotros esta Cuaresma para un devocional de cuaresma mujerista! Cada domingo de Cuaresma y durante toda la Semana Santa, publicaremos un devocional tanto en nuestro sitio web como en las redes sociales. / A Journey to Arise: A Mujerista Lenten Devotional - Join us this Lent for a mujerista lenten devotional! Each Sunday of Lent and throughout Holy Week, we will publish a devotional both on our website and social media.
  • Tread Lightly for Lent, from Presbyterian Mission, PC(USA): Available in English, Spanish and Korean. "The Presbyterian Hunger Program strives to walk with people in moving towards sustainable choices that restore and protect all of God’s children and creation. As people of faith, we seek to “serve and preserve” God’s world. However, some of our collective choices have led to a changing global climate, which translates to warmer temperatures, rising sea-levels, and severe storms, just to name a few. To turn this tide, we must commit to treading lightly on God’s Earth. In Lent, we slow down, take time, and examine our internal spiritual lives and the way we live out our Christian faith in the world around us. Our hope is that this Lenten calendar will be the beginning of actions intended to create more mindful behaviors throughout the year."

Women's History Month

Mar 1, 2022

March is Women's History Month!

We invite you to celebrate by exploring books from the Wright Library collection, including works by Princeton Seminary faculty, as well as recommended research databases, links to related resources, theses, lectures and more, all gathered together in an online bibliography (link below).

Be sure to check out another of our curated bibliographies, linked in this one, compiled in memory and celebration of Rev. Dr. Katie G. Cannon, the first Black woman ordained a minister of word and sacrament in the Presbyterian Church and founder of the Center for Womanist Leadership at Union Presbyterian Seminary.

Faculty publications highlighted in the Women's History Month bibliography include (among others):

  • Addiction and Pastoral Care by Sonia E. Waters
  • African American readings of Paul : reception, resistance, and transformation by Lisa M. Bowens
  • Delighted: what teenagers are teaching the church about joy (e-book) by Kenda Creasy Dean; Wesley W. Ellis; Justin Forbes; Abigail Visco Rusert
  • Notes of a native daughter : testifying in theological education by Keri Day
  • The soul of higher education : contemplative pedagogy, research and institutional life for the twenty-first century edited by Margaret Benefiel and Bo Karen Lee
  • Sunday's Sermon for Monday's World: preaching to shape daring witness by Sally A. Brown

History classes explore the archives

Feb 11, 2022

Students from Prof. Mary Farag's and Prof. Heath Carter's classes got to view materials from Wright Library's Special Collections and Archives up close this week.

On Monday, Prof. Farag brought her History of Christianity in Egypt (CH 5230) class to the Theron Room, where Brian Shetler and Lydia Andeskie carefully arranged materials including incased 5th c. papyri, an Arabic prayer book and items with ornate marginalia from the library's collections.

On Tuesday, Prof. Carter brought students from his History of American Christianity (CH 9051) course to the reading room upstairs. There, materials relating to pre-Revolutionary America, the American Civil War and American missionaries were made available for viewing.

Photos of these materials, including some close-ups, are below.

If you would like to bring your class to the archives, contact Brian and Lydia.

Photos on this page

History of Christianity in Egypt (Farag), February 7, 2022

  • Special Collections and Archives materials staged in the Theron Room including incased 5th c. papyri (far right side)
  • Daw al-Misbah (17th c), containing ornate marginalia
  • An Arabic prayer book (ca. 1767) from the Persian Manuscript Collection with beautifully illuminated pages depicting the Dome of the Rock (verso) and Mecca (with the Ka’aba) (recto).

History of American Christianity (Carter), February 8, 2022

  • Reading room filled with items on display; nearest table holds materials relating to pre-Revolutionary America
  • Table holding materials relating to the Civil War. Most prominently displayed are the diaries of John Jay Pomeroy, a Union Military Chaplain, his writing box, and a bible he used in the field (a gift from his mother). Slightly to the left are sermons delivered by Virginian Henry Carrington Alexander to a Confederate audience.
  • Presbyterian missionary Sheldon Jackson's North Star Scrapbook, opened to a drawing of a day’s catch: Trout and a Sea Serpent by Sal Pipinsky
  • Another photo of the reading room in Special Collections and Archives, Wright Library, Princeton Theological Seminary with the materials on display for the class
photo of Special Collections and Archives materials including incased 5th c. papyri (far right side) staged in the Theron Room, Wright Library, Princeton Theological Seminary
photo of Daw al-Misbah (17th c), a book with ornate marginalia
photo of an Arabic prayer book (ca. 1767) with illuminated pages depicting the Dome of the Rock (verso) and Mecca (with the Ka’aba) (recto)
photo of Special Collections and Archives, Wright Library, Princeton Theological Seminary reading room filled with items on display for the class; nearest table holds materials relating to pre-Revolutionary America
photo of table holding materials relating to the Civil War. Most prominently displayed are the diaries of John Jay Pomeroy, a Union Military Chaplain, his writing box, and a bible he used in the field (a gift from his mother). Slightly to the left are sermons delivered by Virginian Henry Carrington Alexander to a Confederate audience.
photo of Presbyterian missionary Sheldon Jackson's North Star Scrapbook, opened to a drawing of a day’s catch: Trout and a Sea Serpent by Sal Pipinsky.
another photo of the reading room in Special Collections and Archives, Wright Library, Princeton Theological Seminary with the materials on display for the class

Black History Month 2022

Feb 1, 2022

Browse a selection of books and other works by Lisa M. Bowens, Katie G. Cannon, James H. Cone, timone davis, Keri Day, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Angelina Weld Grimké, Dwight Hopkins, Nyasha Junior, Jarena Lee, Darnell L. Moore, Howard Thurman, Eboni Marshall Turman, Desmond Tutu, Chanequa Walker-Barnes, Jesmyn Ward, Ida B. Wells, Phillis Wheatley and many others* in the Black History Month curated bibliography online (link below). The call numbers of these books, the names of their authors and the subject headings found in their library catalog records are all good entry points for further research.

The curated bibliography also contains links to research databases, such as Black Life in America and the Oxford African American Studies Center; lectures, such as the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. lectures at Princeton Theological Seminary; and other suggested reading, listening and viewing.

*Authors and editors include (among others):

  • Albert J. Raboteau
  • Angelique Harris
  • Anthony B. Bradley
  • Austin Channing Brown
  • Betty Livingston Adams
  • Brenda Salter McNeil
  • Brian K. Blount
  • Bruce D. Haynes
  • Cain Hope Felder
  • Carla Jones
  • Cassandra Jackson
  • Cecelia Barr
  • Chad Williams
  • Chanequa Walker-Barnes
  • Charlene A. Carruthers
  • Charles M. Payne
  • Charlotte McSwine-Harris
  • Clarice J. Martin
  • Claudette Copeland
  • Clayborne Carson
  • Cleophus J. LaRue
  • Coretta Scott King
  • Cornel West
  • Courtney Pace
  • Dale P. Andrews
  • Danjuma G. Gibson
  • Darnell L. Moore
  • David Walker
  • Deborah Blanks
  • Deborah Gray White
  • Delores Carpenter
  • Derrick A. Bell
  • Desmond Tutu
  • Dorothy Porter
  • Dwight Hopkins
  • Eboni Marshall Turman
  • Eddie S. Glaude, Jr.
  • Efrem Smith
  • Emerson B. Powery
  • Frantz Fanon
  • Frederick Douglass
  • Gregory C. Ellison, II
  • Harriet Jacobs
  • Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
  • Howard Thurman
  • James Baldwin
  • James H. Cone
  • James Weldon Johnson
  • Jarena Lee
  • Jennifer T. Kaalund
  • Jesmyn Ward
  • Johari Jabir
  • John H. McClendon
  • John Lewis
  • Josef Sorett
  • Juan Williams
  • Judith Weisenfeld
  • Karen D. Crozier
  • Kathryn Watterson
  • Katie G. Cannon
  • Keisha N. Blain
  • Kenyatta R. Gilbert
  • Keri L. Day
  • Khristi Lauren Adams
  • Kidada E. Williams
  • Lisa M. Bowens
  • Malcolm X
  • Manning Marable
  • Margaret Busby
  • Margarita Simon Guillory
  • Maria Thomas
  • Marisa J. Fuentes
  • Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Michael Eric Dyson
  • Monica M. White
  • Natasha Sistrunk Robinson
  • Nyasha Junior
  • Octavia E. Butler
  • Phillis Wheatley
  • Piper Kendrix Williams
  • Quinton H. Dixie
  • Resmaa Menakem
  • Richard J. Douglass-Chin
  • Richard S. Newman
  • Rima Vesely-Flad
  • Robert A. Wortham
  • Shamoon Zamir
  • Stephanie J. Shaw
  • Stephen C. Ferguson
  • Tamura Lomax
  • Ta-Nehisi Coates
  • Toni Morrison
  • Vincent W Lloyd
  • W. E. B. Du Bois
  • Wallace D. Best
  • Walter Earl Fluker
  • Whitney Battle-Baptiste
  • Willie James Jennings
  • Winnifred Brown-Glaude
  • Yolanda N. Pierce
  • Zora Neale Hurston

Reflections: Thich Nhat Hanh at Princeton Seminary

Jan 27, 2022

Biographical Sketch of Thich Nhat Hanh at Princeton Theological Seminary

Thich Nhat Hanh, one of the world’s most influential Zen masters, passed away on January 21, 2022, at the age of 95. Nhat Hanh, a Vietnamese Buddhist monk, was born in Dalat, Vietnam on October 11, 1926. His life’s work as a peace advocate, teacher, poet, and activist took him all over the globe, including a brief but influential stay at Princeton Theological Seminary. Beginning in 1961, Nhat Hanh was a visiting student at Princeton Seminary. He applied for acceptance into the Seminary in 1961 and was accepted as a non-degree-seeking student (also referred to as a “Special Student”) for the 1961-1962 academic year. During that time, he was sponsored and supported by the Institute of International Education (IIE), which provided him with a scholarship that covered tuition, fees, and room & board. This funding was rather modest, as noted in a June 1962 letter from Princeton Seminary Dean Elmer G. Homrighausen, but was supplemented by generous donations and gifts from within the Princeton Seminary community. While at Princeton Seminary, Thich Nhat Hanh (known then as Nguyen Xuan Bao) resided in the dormitories in Brown Hall, attending classes with his fellow seminarians. During his year at the Seminary, Nhat Hanh took five courses—two in the Fall semester and three in the Spring semester. According to the official transcript, his main areas of study were world religions and religious history. A copy of this transcript is located in his alumni file in the Seminary Archives.

According to the official appointment for study that Nhat Hanh received from the IIE in 1961, he was granted permission to be in the United States for one academic year. This limitation was part of the reason that he was not accepted as a degree-seeking student: one year was not enough to earn a degree from the Seminary at the time. All programs at Princeton Seminary were a minimum of two years of schooling (the exception to this being in an area of study requiring prerequisites that Nhat Hanh did not have). This being the case, Nhat Hanh was accepted as a “Special Student” at the graduate level, with funding as noted above but with no expectation of a degree upon completion of his one year of study. During the 1961-1962 academic year, numerous attempts were made by Princeton Seminary faculty and administrators (including President John McCord) to help place Nhat Hanh into a long-term academic program at another institution. These included Princeton University, Yale Divinity, and Harvard Divinity, among others. Eventually, Nhat Hanh was accepted at Union Theological Seminary for the 1962-1963 academic year, where he would be able to pursue coursework both at Union and at Columbia University.

While Thich Nhat Hanh’s stay at Princeton Seminary was relatively short, he is still considered an alumnus of the Seminary and a record of his work here was added to the alumni file collection in the Seminary Archives. This file also records some of the great work of Nhat Hanh’s life, highlighting his role as an international peace activist. According to later publications, Nhat Hanh looked back fondly at his time at the Seminary and, in particular, his relationship with his advisor, Prof. Edward Jurji, Professor of Islamics and Comparative Religion. Throughout the years, Thich Nhat Hanh stayed on the radar of faculty and staff of the Seminary and clippings, letters, and other documents related to his work and life were kept as part of his alumni file in the Princeton Theological Seminary Archives.

For more information about the life and work of Thich Nhat Hanh, take note of recently published obituaries in the New York Times and Associated Press.

To learn more about the Princeton Seminary archives, including materials related to Thich Nhat Hanh, please contact the Special Collections and Archives department.

Brian Shetler

Head of Special Collections and Archives


At right: Photo from Nguyen Xuan Bao (Thich Nhat Hanh)’s Princeton Theological Seminary application, March 1961

Below: Read "Reflections on Princeton By a Vietnamese Buddhist" by Nguyen Xuan Bao (Thich Nhat Hanh) published in The Seminarian.

photo from Nguyen Xuan Bao (Thich Nhat Hanh)’s Princeton Theological Seminary application, March 1961

National Day of Racial Healing

Jan 18, 2022

Wright Library, named for abolitionist, pastor and Princeton Theological Seminary alumnus Rev. Theodore Sedgwick Wright, joins the American Library Association (ALA), the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), and the Society of American Archivists (SAA) in recognizing the sixth annual US National Day of Racial Healing.*

"The naming of the library is a milestone in the implementation of a multi-year action plan to repent for the Seminary’s historical ties to slavery." October 13, 2021 press release

Whether your work and/or scholarship brings you to Wright Library or to other libraries or archives, we encourage you to engage with our history to better understand the present and help bring healing. This bibliography offers some reading and listening resources from Wright Library's general and archival collections and beyond.

*The National Day of Racial Healing is part of a larger movement for Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation (TRHT)—a political and cultural framework developed by Dr. Gail Christopher and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Jan 14, 2022

In observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Wright Library will be closed on Monday, January 17.

Visit the curated bibliography linked below for local events, books and open access articles from the collection and past lectures honoring the life and legacy of the Rev. Dr. King.

ICYMI (in case you missed it)

Jan 4, 2022

In addition to individual e-book titles, Wright Library purchased several databases in 2021, including:

  • Access World News Research Collection (Newsbank)
  • Anchor Yale Bible Commentaries (Bloomsbury)
  • Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary (Bloomsbury)
  • Black Life in America, Series 1, 2 and 3 (Newsbank)
  • Bloomsbury Religion in North America
  • Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek
  • Civil Rights and Social Justice (HeinOnline)
  • Open Society Justice Initiative (HeinOnlne)
  • Tillich Online (De Gruyter)

All databases available to current Princeton Seminary students are in the A-Z list and those available to Princeton Seminary alumni can be found here on the library website (links below).